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Main Forums => The Puke Palace => Topic started by: K Frame on March 30, 2021, 11:58:54 AM

Title: Rib roasts...
Post by: K Frame on March 30, 2021, 11:58:54 AM
Local store has rib roasts on sale -- 4 to 6 pounds, $40.

I've never done a rib roast before, and don't really eat a lot of beef in general. But, I'm thinking of doing one this weekend for Easter...

Any tips, tricks?

I'm seriously considering sous viding it then finishing it on my Weber kettle just long enough to give it a nice crust.
Title: Re: Rib roasts...
Post by: charby on March 30, 2021, 12:10:57 PM
Bone in or boneless?
Title: Re: Rib roasts...
Post by: charby on March 30, 2021, 12:34:42 PM
Back when I could still eat beef this is how I did rib roasts/prime rib

https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/prime_rib/
Title: Re: Rib roasts...
Post by: K Frame on March 30, 2021, 01:44:46 PM
Bone in. No other way as far as I'm concerned.
Title: Re: Rib roasts...
Post by: charby on March 30, 2021, 02:27:27 PM
Bone in. No other way as far as I'm concerned.

Sold both ways here. Bone in it's sold as a standing rib roast, boneless it is sold as a prime rib roast or ribeye roast. If it's sold in steak form it is a ribeye steak. I think they are called Delmonico steaks in your neck of the woods.

Full rib bone attached in ribeye steaks are becoming popular here, I think it is a way to make more money selling bone. They are often marked it as a hatchet or tomahawk ribeye.

 
Title: Re: Rib roasts...
Post by: K Frame on March 30, 2021, 02:41:00 PM
I've seen both Delmonico and Ribeye, but I'm far more familiar with ribeye.
Title: Re: Rib roasts...
Post by: zxcvbob on March 30, 2021, 02:49:05 PM
Sold both ways here. Bone in it's sold as a standing rib roast, boneless it is sold as a prime rib roast or ribeye roast. If it's sold in steak form it is a ribeye steak. I think they are called Delmonico steaks in your neck of the woods.

Full rib bone attached in ribeye steaks are becoming popular here, I think it is a way to make more money selling bone. They are often marked it as a hatchet or tomahawk ribeye.


That should be a tomahawk chop rather than a tomahawk steak.  Just because it's funnier :D
Title: Re: Rib roasts...
Post by: charby on March 30, 2021, 03:12:50 PM
I've seen both Delmonico and Ribeye, but I'm far more familiar with ribeye.

I wasn't sure where the Delmonico/Ribeye line is. :)

I know where the hot dish vs casserole line is.
Title: Re: Rib roasts...
Post by: K Frame on March 30, 2021, 03:23:01 PM
Delmonico is used more and more the closer you get to New York. In Pennsylvania you'd see both depending on the store/restaurant you were at.

You'd also see it used to describe things like Delmonico T-bone, Delmonico Porterhouse, denoting a thicker-than-normal cut.
Title: Re: Rib roasts...
Post by: charby on March 30, 2021, 03:29:55 PM
Delmonico is used more and more the closer you get to New York. In Pennsylvania you'd see both depending on the store/restaurant you were at.

You'd also see it used to describe things like Delmonico T-bone, Delmonico Porterhouse, denoting a thicker-than-normal cut.

Kind of like a Iowa pork chop, which is about a 1.25" pork chop. Cowboy cut is something else used hear to denote a thicker cut, like a cowboy cut T-bone.

Also king and queen is used to describe a serving size of prime rib.

Another one that is making me scratch my head is a porterhouse pork chop, another fancy way to sell a cut of pork chop at a higher price.
Title: Re: Rib roasts...
Post by: Andiron on March 30, 2021, 11:40:11 PM
I've made a grand total of 4, using the Chef John method.  Simple, and good results each time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUQ49SoteE0&t=2s
Title: Re: Rib roasts...
Post by: K Frame on April 03, 2021, 08:38:54 AM
After really thinking it over, I went with a ham.

Looked so good, though.