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R.I.P. Scout26

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Author Topic: "Uncontained Engine Failure."  (Read 2202 times)

BobR

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Re: "Uncontained Engine Failure."
« Reply #75 on: March 03, 2021, 06:31:47 PM »

Wait, What?  You don't?  Why not?

We used different power setting for weights, weather, etc. We set power by Turbine Inlet Temperature. In degrees Celsius we would use 1077 for max t/o, 1010 for reduced power and once light enough and doing touch and goes we would do 950 degrees. It helped prolong the life of the turbine, above 950 degrees   sulfidation on the turbines blade happened much faster. Our cruise TIT was kept at 925 or 950 degrees as long as we could maintain altitude and keep going forward.

bob

230RN

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Re: "Uncontained Engine Failure."
« Reply #76 on: March 04, 2021, 10:41:25 AM »

sulfidation link per Fly320s dogmush BobR:
https://www.pwc.ca/en/airtime-blog/articles/technical-tips/protecting-your-engine-against-sulfidation

So about this engine-washing to get rid of sulfidation... what do they do, just squirt tons of water into a running engine, or run the blades up to speed by by external power, then squirt it?

(I've seen vids of testing a running engine by squirting lots of water into it to see when it will stall out.  This, to assess behavior in a heavy rainstorm.  Seems like the darn things can ingest a lot of water without gagging.)

(Interesting point about using compressor outlet temp as a running parameter.  Thanks, Fly320s BobR.)

Terry, groundlubber, but loves plane stuff, 230RN

Afterthought:  Not doubting you, but just double-checking.  Those temps in °C you cited seem awfully hot.  Do you really mean °F?
« Last Edit: March 07, 2021, 06:58:54 AM by 230RN »
The funny thing is, people don't get mad at me because I'm wrong.  They get mad at me because I'm right.

sumpnz

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Re: "Uncontained Engine Failure."
« Reply #77 on: March 04, 2021, 12:18:00 PM »

Terry - they use a lot of titanium and high temperature steels in those engines.  And remember that’s the gas temperature.  The metals get hot, but not that hot.

Fly320s

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Re: "Uncontained Engine Failure."
« Reply #78 on: March 04, 2021, 01:28:21 PM »

All that fancy talk about TIT ( =D) and sulfidation was from Dogmush, not me.  I just push buttons to make things go.  I aren't smart enough to know how it all works.
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MechAg94

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Re: "Uncontained Engine Failure."
« Reply #79 on: March 04, 2021, 01:45:19 PM »

^^^I am told by my many local Boeing neighbors and friends that modern jet engines are so reliable these days is that all Boeing does is mount the complete engine on the pylons.  They don't do any engine assembly or work other than making sure it starts up and completes the checklist.  As I drive by Paine Field, I often see umounted jet engines, securely shrink-wrapped, sitting on stands outside the assembly building waiting to be mounted on the airframe.
I would think the make them modular so they can do any engine rebuild work in one place instead of needing the rotating equipment technicians all over. 
“It is much more important to kill bad bills than to pass good ones.”  ― Calvin Coolidge

MechAg94

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Re: "Uncontained Engine Failure."
« Reply #80 on: March 04, 2021, 01:48:20 PM »

One of our stationary compressors I used to be involved with had rotating blades.  It wrecked after I was no longer there.  The engineer involved showed me a mangled blade that had "Snap-On" imprinted on it.  A compressor technician left a socket inside the compressor after an overhaul.  Wrecked on start up.
“It is much more important to kill bad bills than to pass good ones.”  ― Calvin Coolidge

230RN

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Re: "Uncontained Engine Failure."
« Reply #81 on: March 04, 2021, 04:36:14 PM »

All that fancy talk about TIT ( =D) and sulfidation was from Dogmush, not me.  I just push buttons to make things go.  I aren't smart enough to know how it all works.

Oops.  Sorry about that.  With your post ^, I'll let it stand as is to avoid a correction mish mosh.
The funny thing is, people don't get mad at me because I'm wrong.  They get mad at me because I'm right.

Fly320s

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Re: "Uncontained Engine Failure."
« Reply #82 on: March 04, 2021, 05:20:07 PM »

I would think the make them modular so they can do any engine rebuild work in one place instead of needing the rotating equipment technicians all over.

Airlines just pull the engines off and ship them out to a vendor for overhaul.  Outsourcing is cheaper.

We can change engines as needed, but the overhaul is time-intensive, expensive work.
Islamic sex dolls.  Do they blow themselves up?

230RN

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Re: "Uncontained Engine Failure."
« Reply #83 on: March 05, 2021, 08:28:39 AM »

OK, I reckon it's so.  It just tickled my reality check neurons to think an axial flow compressor could get the gas that hot (the presssure that high.)

A lot of modernity boggles me.  I was watching a bunch of drone videos and those batteries lasting that long surprised me.  Son1 or 2 mentioned that these R/C-ers keep their batteries in steel ammo boxes in case they explode.

Egad.
The funny thing is, people don't get mad at me because I'm wrong.  They get mad at me because I'm right.

230RN

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Re: "Uncontained Engine Failure."
« Reply #84 on: March 07, 2021, 07:12:11 AM »

MechaG94 noted:

Quote
...
The engineer involved showed me a mangled blade that had "Snap-On" imprinted on it.  A compressor technician left a socket inside the compressor after an overhaul.  Wrecked on start up.


Gotta watch them damned sockets.

https://www.theverge.com/2017/1/10/14232574/command-and-controll-titan-2-damascus-arkansas-nuclear-accident-1980

Quote
...

The film starts in September 1980, when a 21-year-old missile technician named Dave Powell dropped the socket from a socket-wrench. Dropping a socket isn’t that unusual, but what followed was.
....

“There were many heroes that night.”

Powell was working on a Titan II missile fitted with a thermonuclear warhead, tucked away underground in Damascus, Arkansas. When the socket fell, it plunged 70 feet to pierce the side of the Titan II missile. (It was a large socket and it bounced off something else and hit the rocket --Terry) The puncture released pressurized rocket fuel and set off a chaotic series of events and decisions that highlighted a chain of command ill-prepared to deal with disaster. One young man died as a result.

The film is driven by a series of moving interviews with the Air Force crew members who were on the base, as well as with the scientists, policy makers, and military higher-ups connected with the accident. Many, it’s clear, have still not recovered from that September night in 1980.

Terry, 230RN

The funny thing is, people don't get mad at me because I'm wrong.  They get mad at me because I'm right.
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